" The recent release of new data confirms dementia remains the leading cause of death of women and the second leading cause of death of all Australians. "
Dementia the leading cause of death of women, second of all Australians

Australians are more likely to die of dementia than almost any other disease – with the exception of heart disease. The recent release of new data confirms dementia remains the leading cause of death of women and the second leading cause of death of all Australians.

According to the Causes of Death 2018 data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, cause of death by heart disease has decreased by 22.4 per cent since 2009 while dementia rates have increased by 68.6 per cent in the same period.

Dementia Australia CEO Maree McCabe said without a major medical breakthrough this trend is likely to continue, with the report stating that dementia will become the leading cause of death in coming years.

“With more than 447,000 Australians currently living with dementia, and the number expected to increase to almost 1.1 million by 2058, dementia is the chronic disease of the 21st century,” Ms McCabe said.

“Australian and international research shows there is a lack of knowledge about dementia and the global World Alzheimer Report released on 21 September 2019 reveals a staggering 95 per cent of people think they will develop dementia in their lifetime.

“While age is a risk factor, dementia is not a normal part of ageing.

“It is a progressive and, ultimately, terminal disease.

“With a lack of understanding comes discrimination.  People living with dementia share with us the impact that discrimination has on their everyday life.

“Discrimination around dementia is a potential barrier between major breakthroughs in research and funding that could improve the lives of people living with dementia.

“Hence our focus on discrimination during Dementia Action Week last week, with the theme – Dementia doesn’t discriminate. Do you?”

 Posted: October 14th, 2019
Discussion

Brenda O’Donovan said:

Am scared.....bB

Brenda O’Donovan said:

I have just been diagnosed with Dementia this morning and it frightens me , do you have any advice

Lisa pickett said:

Most people need stay active. Enjoy life to fullest

David Kapeen said:

That is scary, can anyone tell me if there is any research being done on Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people, other than the Kimberly report, if yes please advise me, I am from the Bundjalung Nation and if there is anything happening in my country I would love to know

Lynne Low said:

Asa i am only 51 and was diagnosed 0ver a year ago i hope it improves comsiderably .

Lynne Low said:

Asa i am only 51 and was diagnosed 0ver a year ago i hope it improves comsiderably .

Lynne Low said:

As i am only 51

Maureen McDonald said:

My sister has vascular dementia and has been in care for just on 13 years and was sick previously at home before she went into care. Everything has to be done for her. She cant feed herself & only says a word very rarely. She takes a long time to feed as she has lost her swallow. I do hope the staff spend the time to feed her all of

Katrina Burke said:

My mum has dementia and has slipped on the scale from 20 to 3 in a very short space of time. I feel for all people with the god awful disease & their families trying to cope with it. More research is definitely needed to try to nip it in the bud before it accelerates to the point where it is unbearable.

Tania Depane said:

I am a support worker for two ladies that have dementia aged 65 & 55 years of age.Im not sure about it being discriminated against I think it’s just not that well understood. When I have been out with my clients I have found people to be very helpful.

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