" There is strong evidence that regular physical activity is associated with better brain function and reduced risk of cognitive decline and dementia. "
New program to get older Australians more active may reduce risk of dementia

Dementia Australia welcomed the Federal Government’s announcement of $22.9 million towards the Move It Aus Better Ageing Grants, which will focus on helping inactive people aged 65 and older to become more physically active and socially connected.

Dementia Australia Executive Director of Business Development, Leanne Emerson, said she is very positive about the move which will benefit hundreds of thousands of senior Australians in coming years, including the people over 65 who are living with dementia.

“While there are some risk factors for dementia we can’t control, such as genetics or age, many risk factors can be modified through lifestyle changes.

“There is strong evidence that regular physical activity is associated with better brain function and reduced risk of cognitive decline and dementia.

“Social engagement has also been found to contribute to building brain reserve which then contributes to a lower dementia risk,” said Ms Emerson.

The successful organisations will provide a wide range of opportunities, from simple exercise classes to adapted programs in traditional sports.

“By providing new exciting and engaging activities, this government initiative will hopefully work to reduce the growing numbers of people diagnosed with dementia by promoting healthy behaviours known to be associated with lower dementia risk.

“Programs like this are essential as they put services into place that will assist people to live well for longer.”

For further information about the grants click here.

 Posted: February 12th, 2019
Discussion

Anne Phefley said:

It is wise to underline "may". My sister was very fit played golf and tennis was involved in community activities and U3A. She still got Alzheimers in her 70s. No family history either.

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